Daily Event for September 14


In mid September 1942 convoy PQ-18 was making its way through the Barents Sea en route to Murmansk,
Russia. The convoy contained more than 40 merchant ships under heavy escort. During the voyage 13 of these were sunk including the Mary Luckenbach. She was built at Hog Island, Pennsylvania in 1919 and named Sac
City, during the First World War she was a commissioned U.S. Navy ship using the same name. After the war
she was returned to the U.S. Shipping Board and later renamed Black Falcon. In 1941 she was renamed Mary
Luckenbach.

On Sept. 14, 1942 the ship was attacked by German aircraft and hit by an aerial torpedo, from there the story
is short and sad. The explosion was so violent the ship was basically vaporized along with the entire crew.
© 2008 Michael W. Pocock
MaritimeQuest.com


USS Sac City ID-3861.





Roll of Honor
In memory of those who lost their lives in SS Mary Luckenbach
"As long as we embrace them in our memory, their spirit will always be with us"

Name
Rate
Adams, Howard
2nd Mate
Merchant Marine
Armand, Louis
Deck Engineer
Merchant Marine
Ayers, George G.
Seaman 1st Class
U.S. Navy
Baker, Charles A.
Chief Mate
Merchant Marine
Baker, John W.
Seaman 2nd Class
U.S. Navy
Berman, Carl
Able Seaman
Merchant Marine
Brown, Andy
Cook
Merchant Marine
Butler, Lockwood L.
Boatswain's Mate 2nd Class
U.S. Navy
Cannon, Nelson A.
Seaman 1st Class
U.S. Navy
Carlsen, David A.
Able Seaman
Merchant Marine
Chadwick, John K.
Master
Merchant Marine
Corbeil, Albert W.
Ordinary Seaman
Merchant Marine
Delehanty, John A.
Ordinary Seaman
Merchant Marine
Delich, Michael
Oiler
Merchant Marine
Duncan, Gus
Utility
Merchant Marine
Flores, Francisco
Wiper
Merchant Marine
Flynn, Joseph P.
Able Seaman
Merchant Marine
Fontaina, Antonio
Fireman/Watertender
Merchant Marine
Fowler, John T.
Gunner's Mate 3rd Class
U.S. Navy
Galko, Emil P.
3rd Mate
Merchant Marine
Gorham, George M.
Oiler
Merchant Marine
Grenuk, George
Gunner's Mate 3rd Class
U.S. Navy
Grubb, Harry P. A.
Fireman/Watertender
Merchant Marine
Josephs, Thomas E.
Messman
Merchant Marine
Kelly, Josephus
Seaman 2nd Class
U.S. Navy
Kersey, James D.
Seaman 2nd Class
U.S. Navy
King, Vernon M.
Seaman 2nd Class
U.S. Navy
Kirby, Robert P.
Seaman 2nd Class
U.S. Navy
Lane, Hershel T.
Seaman 1st Class
U.S. Navy
Lenderman, William E.
Seaman 2nd Class
U.S. Navy
Lindsay Jr., Alvin
Seaman 2nd Class
U.S. Navy
Luik, Edmund
Carpenter
Merchant Marine
Malilay, Patricio
Fireman/Watertender
Merchant Marine
Mandis, James
Able Seaman
Merchant Marine
Mastroianni, Joseph V.
Seaman 1st Class
U.S. Navy
McLaughlin, Daniel C.
Seaman 2nd Class
U.S. Navy
Melendez, Justino
Fireman/Watertender
Merchant Marine
Miller, Willis
Cook
Merchant Marine
Mitchell, Curtis P.
Seaman 2nd Class
U.S. Navy
Monios, Jacovos
Fireman/Watertender
Merchant Marine
Morgan, Charlie G.
Seaman 2nd Class
U.S. Navy
Nicholas Jr., William
Able Seaman
Merchant Marine
Orellana, Carlos
Wiper
Merchant Marine
Palmer, Charles O.
1st Engineer
Merchant Marine
Patterson, George B.
Lieutenant (j.g)
U.S. Navy
Pitblado, James
Chief Engineer
Merchant Marine
Precht, Charles E.
Seaman 1st Class
U.S. Navy
Prescott, Roger W.
Able Seaman
Merchant Marine
Reardon, Maurice J.
Ordinary Seaman
Merchant Marine
Robinson, Ivan
Messman
Merchant Marine
Roye, James
Cook
Merchant Marine
Scichitaro, Dominic P.
Seaman 1st Class
U.S. Navy
Shauck, Elmer L.
Seaman 1st Class
U.S. Navy
Sherriff, Cecil
Messman
Merchant Marine
Smith, William A.
Coxswain
U.S. Navy
Stetina, Harold Y.
3rd Engineer
Merchant Marine
Strange, Thomas E.
Seaman 3rd Class
U.S. Navy
Suarez, Juan
Fireman/Watertender
Merchant Marine
Turk, Edward J.
Seaman 2nd Class
U.S. Navy
Vaughan, John F.
2nd Engineer
Merchant Marine
Vieira, Joseph
Bosun
Merchant Marine
Ward, Edwin C.
Radio Officer
Merchant Marine
Williams, Charles A.
Messman
Merchant Marine
Wolf, Robert D.
Seaman 1st Class
U.S. Navy
Zulpo, Renzo
Oiler
Merchant Marine
       
September 20, 2012

I was born one year after my 19 year old cousin, Maurice Reardon, went down with the SS Mary Luckenbach.  He was the first grandchild and his loss was felt throughout the generations. I have often thought about him over the years and have spoken to veterans of that era.  70 years have passed but I still feel a strength of pride in a young man I never knew but “went down to sea in a stout ship” and paid a terrible price. He will never be forgotten.

Frederick J. Scheffler