World War II As It Happened
A MaritimeQuest Daily Event Special Presentation
Sunday February 8, 1942
Day 892

February 8, 1942: Front page of The People, London, England.
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February 8, 1942: Front page of the Sunday Pictorial, London, England.
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February 8, 1942: Front page of The Sunday Post, Glasgow, Scotland.
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February 8, 1942: Front page of The Sunday Sun, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
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Note the report in columns 3-5: "Jap Cruiser Sunk In Indies"
(This report is about the Battle of the Makassar Strait. Two U.S. cruisers were damaged, but no warships, on either side, were sunk. Up to this point in the war, no Japanese cruisers had been sunk. Mikuma was the first Japanese cruiser sunk which happened at the Battle of Midway on June 6, 1942.)


February 8, 1942: Front page of The Sunday Star, Washington, D.C.
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Note the report in columns 6-7: "Survivors of S-26 Describe How 33 Were Lost in Collision"


February 8, 1942: Front page of The Sunday Star-News, Wilmington, North Carolina.
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February 8, 1942: Front page of the Detroit Times, Detroit, Michigan.
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February 8, 1942: Front page of The Hammond Times, Hammond, Indiana.
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February 8, 1942: Front page of The Kingsport Times, Kingsport, Tennessee.
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February 8, 1942: Front page of The Port Arthur News, Port Arthur, Texas.
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February 8, 1942: Front page of The Montana Standard, Butte, Montana.
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Note the report in column 7: "Measures Against U-Boats Meet Increased Success"
(The Navy was the source for this propaganda piece. After claiming that 80 U-boats were in the waters off the U.S. east coast, and later claiming that they had sunk or damaged no less than 20 of them, now they state that the war against U-boats is “meeting with increasing successes.” The U-boat offensive, Operation Paukenschlag, [Operation Drumbeat,] which started on Jan. 13, consisted of only six U-Boats. Furthermore, the total number of U-boats sunk by U.S. forces to date was zero.

The Navy knew there were only six U-boats operating off the coast because the British told them they were on the way. The Navy positively knew they had not sunk a single U-boat, because there had been no physical evidence of a sinking and there had not been one single German sailor recovered from the water. If they had thought they probably sank any is not known to me, but they knew the number was certainly not twenty. The first U-boat sunk by U.S. forces was U-656, which was sunk on Mar. 1, 1942 by a Lockheed Hudson flown by Ens. William Tepuni, USNR of VP-82. This was off Newfoundland. A second, U-503, was sunk off Newfoundland by VP-82 on Mar. 15th. The first U-boat sunk off the U.S. east coast was U-85, which was sunk by USS Roper DD-147 on Apr. 14, 1942.)


February 8, 1942: Front page of The Ogden Standard Examiner, Ogden City, Utah.
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Note the whole front page is devoted to a multi-page report on the importance of railroads in the war effort.


February 8, 1942: Front page of the Oakland Tribune, Oakland, California.
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February 8, 1942: Front page of the Völkischer Beobachter, the official newspaper of the NSDAP.
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1. USA. und Großbritannien überall in der Defensive.
(USA and Great Britain on the defensive everywhere.)
2. Bedeutende Erfolge in Nordafrika.
(Significant successes in North Africa.)




   
Page published February 8, 2023